Book Review: "Animal Farm"

 

"All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others."

On the outside, Animal Farm is just a story about farm animals that create their own society. It is written in simple prose and there is nothing grotesque or inappropriate in the novel. In fact, some say this book is suitable for children. But that's the horrifying part about this book.

Written by George Orwell satirizing the Russian Revolution and Stalin's rise to power, Animal Farm is about the animals on Manor Farm who decide to revolt from their owner after years of maltreatment. Pigs, being the smartest animals on the farm, become the leaders. They name their newfound philosophy Animalism and decide upon seven commandments of their society. As the novel progresses, the pigs take advantage of their power and their simpleminded animal comrades. Additionally, the pigs start acting more human, participating in trade with humans and drinking alcohol. Along with this advantage of power, we see the seven commandments crumbling. This book has been banned in many countries, and shows the disturbing consequences of Socialism as seen in Orwell's times.

The novel does not only apply to the Russian Revolution, but to all revolutions and those who attempt to rise to power in unethical ways. This novel is somewhat predictable and evidences what most of us know about human nature. Nonetheless, this classic is a great novel, and I highly recommend it for those who want a short read but still want a thought-provoking piece of literature.

Lydia Kim is a Technical Writing major at Carnegie Mellon University. In her free time, she likes to eat everything in the house, read, and watch a concerning amount of Netflix. She also enjoys wearing her hotdog costume to formal events.

Lydia Kim is a Technical Writing major at Carnegie Mellon University. In her free time, she likes to eat everything in the house, read, and watch a concerning amount of Netflix. She also enjoys wearing her hotdog costume to formal events.